Psalm 150 Song with Kids: Halleleluyah Praise and Play Music (+ tips on using instruments with kids)

Psalm 150 Song with Kids: Halleleluyah Praise and Play Music (+ tips on using instruments with kids)

This Psalm 150 song, We’re Makin’ Music, is designed to encourage creative self expression through rhythmic play.

Teach that a musical instrument can simply be anything that is used to make musical sound. Music is organized sound. Go on a field trip in your environment to look for items that can be used to make musical sounds (sticks, pots and pans, shoes, toys….).  Share a variety of instruments encourage exploration and play throughout the song.

Create your own musical instruments using beans, rice, rubber bands, or anything that else that you have handy.

A wide variety of instruments are easily made with everyday objects, research the best option for the materials you have available. Throughout the day, encourage the use of planned or spontaneous music as a way to pray and play.

Scroll down for lyrics. We’re Makin’ Music – Psalm 150 Song chords and lead sheet here.

This can be a ‘Zipper’ song-  names can be substituted for ‘we’re’ throughout the song, so if you choose to sing the song (rather than play the recording) this can be an opportunity to recognize specific children and their emerging skills:

Talya makes music, tambourine music, she shakes and taps today

David makes music, dances to music, he likes to move while we play

Libby hears music, and watches bigger kids play, she’s really learning today

Jonah makes music, he coos and claps, babies know just how to play….

Halleluyah” means “Praise G-d” and one way you can help families remember this is asking them to practice sharing praise, with one another, in real time.

Everyone likes to hear about what other people like and love about them- no matter their age. Make it happen in your space to foster positive associations and to deepen relationships.

Ask the participants to look around and tell the people around them something they like or love about them.

If young children and the grown ups that love them are involved, make sure to explicitly instruct kiddos to to tell their grown-ups something they like or love about them, too (it seems that by default, the adults assume I’m taking only to the adults when I do this).

Ask them how it feels (usually they say ‘great!’). Then tell them that “Halleluyah” is a way for people to give praise to God, if you want to draw out the discussion, you can ask for examples of praise that people want to share with G-d- but that can go long and is tricky to hold attention, especially if the kids know that musical toys will soon be shared.

If you are going to add instruments to your sharing of a Psalm 150 song, great! Make sure you know, specifically, why and when you plan to do so.

Present jammers with lots of types of instruments- and let THEM dump the bag or container, that discovery is sometimes the favorite part of this process. 

Model use of various instruments- but don’t tell the children what to do- create a safe environment for exploration.

‘Sportscast’ the things you see:

Dylan is using a tambourine to make music.

Wow! Talya is using her tapping sticks to roll, bang and point.

Thank you so much for sharing with the baby, David. It looks like you are choosing kind choices today.

When Lola holds 2 shaker eggs in one hand, she is developing fine motor skills, putting that pinkie to work!

I see that Jason is having some feelings about the fact that Jonah is using a toy he wants…Jason, you seem frustrated…how can we help you get what you need?

This list goes on and on- but the point I’m trying to make is that you can model for other adults in the room various ways that you can support their play.

Sometimes I’ll make a point to say to the adults: “It looks like Tommy is very intensely engaged in his play! I am tempted to go ask him about what he is doing- but I don’t want to interrupt his focus” or something like that…this kind of song and activity is a great opportunity for a leader to focus on cultivating relationships.

Once you’ve made the decision to distribute instruments to children- plan how much flexibility and spontaneity you want to incorporate. If the children are having a great time and the adults are engaged- you might choose to keep the activity going. Here is a playlist of Halleluyah and Psalm 150 Songs I like to share that you can play to keep the momentum up while the theme stays intact while also allowing you as the leader to catch you breath.

We’re Making Music – Psalm 150 song lyrics:

We’re making music, We’re making music, We’re making music today
We’re making music, We’re making music, we really know how to play
We’re making music, We’re making music, We’re making music today
We’re making music, We’re making music, it is one way to pray

Kol haneshaema, tehalalya- halelu yah!
Let Every Voice Praise G*D- we say praise G*D haleluyah

Praise G*D with my clapping hands, Praise G*D with my stomping feet haleluyah
Praise G*D with my shaker egg,Praise G*D with my tambourine, haleluyah
Praise G*D with snapping fingers , Praise G*D with my air guitar, haleluyah
Praise G*D with my triangle, Praise G*D with my dancing haleluyah

*instrumental break
We’re making music, We’re making music, We’re making music today
We’re making music, We’re making music, we really know how to play
We’re making music, We’re making music, We’re making music today
We’re making music, We’re making music, it is one way to pray

Kol haneshaema, tehalalya- halelu yah!
Let Every Voice Praise G*D- we say praise G*D haleluyah

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.